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augmented_reality

Augmented reality

The use of intraoperative navigation during microscope cases can be limited when attention needs to be divided between the operative field and the navigation screens. Heads-up display (HUD), also referred to as augmented reality, permits visualization of navigation information during surgery workflow.

Mascitelli et al. retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent HUD-assisted surgery from April 2016 through April 2017. All lesions were assessed for accuracy and those from the latter half of the study were assessed for utility.

Seventy-nine patients with 84 pathologies were included. Pathologies included aneurysms (14), arteriovenous malformations (6), cavernous malformations (5), intracranial stenosis (3), meningiomas (27), metastasis (4), craniopharygniomas (4), gliomas (4), schwannomas (3), epidermoid/dermoids (3), pituitary adenomas (2) hemangioblastoma (2), choroid plexus papilloma (1), lymphoma (1), osteoblastoma (1), clival chordoma (1), cerebrospinal fluid leak (1), abscess (1), and a cerebellopontine angle Teflon granuloma (1). Fifty-nine lesions were deep and 25 were superficial. Structures identified included the lesion (81), vessels (48), and nerves/brain tissue (31). Accuracy was deemed excellent (71.4%), good (20.2%), or poor (8.3%). Deep lesions were less likely to have excellent accuracy (P = .029). HUD was used during bed/head positioning (50.0%), skin incision (17.3%), craniotomy (23.1%), dural opening (26.9%), corticectomy (13.5%), arachnoid opening (36.5%), and intracranial drilling (13.5%). HUD was deactivated at some point during the surgery in 59.6% of cases. There were no complications related to HUD use.

HUD can be safely used for a wide variety of vascular and oncologic intracranial pathologies and can be utilized during multiple stages of surgery 1).


Augmented reality technology

Augmented reality technology has been used for intraoperative image guidance through the overlay of virtual images, from preoperative imaging study, onto the real-world surgical field.

The direct projection of a virtual image to the patients head, skull, or brain surface in real time is an augmented reality system that can be used for image guided neurosurgery 2).

Information supplied by an image-guidance system can be superimposed on the operating microscope oculars or on a screen, generating augmented reality. Recently, the outline of a patient's head and skull, injected in the oculars of a standard operating microscope, has been used to check the registration accuracy of image guidance.

A commercially available image-guidance system and a standard operating microscope were used. Segmentation of the brain surface and cortical blood vessel relief was performed manually on preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. The overlay of segmented digital and real operating-microscope images was used to monitor image-guidance accuracy. Adjustment for brain shift was performed by manually matching digital images on real structures.

Experimental manipulation on a phantom proved that the brain surface relief could be used to restore accuracy if the primary registration shifted. Afterward, the technique was used to assist during surgery of 5 consecutive patients with 7 deep-seated brain tumors. The brain surface relief could be successfully used to monitor registration accuracy after craniotomy and during the whole procedure. If a certain degree of brain shift occurred after craniotomy, the accuracy could be restored in all cases, and corticotomies were correctly centered in all cases.

The proposed method was easy to perform and augmented image-guidance accuracy when operating on small deep-seated lesions 3).

Although setups based on augmented reality have been used for various neurosurgical pathologies, very few cases have been reported for the surgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVM).

5 patients underwent AVM resection assisted by augmented reality. Virtual three-dimensional models of patients' heads, skulls, AVM nidi, and feeder and drainage vessels were selectively segmented and injected into the microscope's eyepiece for intraoperative image guidance, and their usefulness was assessed in each case.

Although the setup helped in performing tailored craniotomies, in guiding dissection and in localizing drainage veins, it did not provide the surgeon with useful information concerning feeder arteries, due to the complexity of AVM angioarchitecture.

The difficulty in intraoperatively conveying useful information on feeder vessels may make augmented reality a less engaging tool in this form of surgery, and might explain its underrepresentation in the literature. Integrating an AVM's hemodynamic characteristics into the augmented rendering could make it more suited to AVM surgery 4).

Solves the problem of view switching in traditional image-guided neurosurgery systems by integrating computer-generated objects into the actual scene. However, the state-of-the-art AR solution using head-mounted displays has not been widely accepted in clinical applications because it causes some inconvenience for the surgeon during surgery.

The easy-to-use Tablet-AR system presented in a study is accurate and feasible in clinical applications and has the potential to become a routine device in AR neuronavigation 5).

Augmented reality technology has been used for intraoperative image guidance through the overlay of virtual images, from preoperative imaging studies, onto the real-world surgical field. Although setups based on augmented reality have been used for various neurosurgical pathologies, very few cases have been reported for the surgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVM).

The difficulty in intraoperatively conveying useful information on feeder vessels may make augmented reality a less engaging tool in this form of surgery, and might explain its underrepresentation in the literature. Integrating an AVM's hemodynamic characteristics into the augmented rendering could make it more suited to AVM surgery 6).

Although further studies need to be performed to evaluate whether certain groups of aneurysms are more likely to benefit from it. Further technological development is required to improve its user friendliness 7).

1)
Mascitelli JR, Schlachter L, Chartrain AG, Oemke H, Gilligan J, Costa AB, Shrivastava RK, Bederson JB. Navigation-Linked Heads-Up Display in Intracranial Surgery: Early Experience. Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown). 2017 Oct 10. doi: 10.1093/ons/opx205. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29040677.
2)
Mahvash M, Besharati Tabrizi L. A novel augmented reality system of image projection for image-guided neurosurgery. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2013 May;155(5):943-7. doi: 10.1007/s00701-013-1668-2. Epub 2013 Mar 15. PubMed PMID: 23494133.
3)
Kantelhardt SR, Gutenberg A, Neulen A, Keric N, Renovanz M, Giese A. Video-Assisted Navigation for Adjustment of Image-Guidance Accuracy to Slight Brain Shift. Neurosurgery. 2015 Jul 30. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26230043.
4)
Cabrilo I, Bijlenga P, Schaller K. Augmented reality in the surgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: technique assessment and considerations. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2014 Sep;156(9):1769-74. doi: 10.1007/s00701-014-2183-9. Epub 2014 Jul 20. PubMed PMID: 25037466.
5)
Deng W, Li F, Wang M, Song Z. Easy-to-use augmented reality neuronavigation using a wireless tablet PC. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 2014;92(1):17-24. doi: 10.1159/000354816. Epub 2013 Nov 8. PubMed PMID: 24216673.
6)
Cabrilo I, Bijlenga P, Schaller K. Augmented reality in the surgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: technique assessment and considerations. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2014 Jul 20. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25037466.
7)
Cabrilo I, Bijlenga P, Schaller K. Augmented reality in the surgery of cerebral aneurysms: a technical report. Neurosurgery. 2014 Jun;10 Suppl 2:252-60; discussion 260-1. doi: 10.1227/NEU.0000000000000328. PubMed PMID: 24594927.
augmented_reality.txt · Last modified: 2018/03/29 16:13 by administrador