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central_sulcus

Central sulcus

see central sulcus region

The central sulcus is a fold in the cerebral cortex in the brains of vertebrates. Also called the central fissure, it was originally called the fissure of Rolando or the Rolandic fissure, after Luigi Rolando. It is sometimes confused with the medial longitudinal fissure.

The central sulcus is a prominent landmark of the brain, separating the parietal lobe from the frontal lobe and the primary motor cortex from the primary somatosensory cortex.

The central sulcus joins the Sylvian fissure in only 2 % of cases.

During neurosurgical procedures, it is sometimes difficult to understand the cortical anatomy of this region.

In 68/82 hemispheres, the central sulcus did not reach the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus. A knob on the second curve of the precentral gyrus was reliably identified in only 64/82 hemispheres 1).


Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are mainly located in the frontal region, with a particular tropism for the central sulcus.

1)
Rodrigues T, Rodrigues M, Paz D, Costa MD, Santos B, Braga V, Paiva Neto Md, Centeno R, Cavalheiro S, Chaddad-Neto F. Is the omega sign a reliable landmark for the neurosurgical team? An anatomical study about the central sulcus region. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2015 Nov;73(11):934-8. doi: 10.1590/0004-282×20150160. PubMed PMID: 26517217.
central_sulcus.txt · Last modified: 2016/12/14 13:30 (external edit)