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cerebral_echinococcosis

Cerebral echinococcosis

Cerebral echinococcosis is very rare, representing 2% of all cystic echinococcosis (CE) cases. Primary echinococcal cysts of the brain are extremely rare in pediatric patients.

As cerebral CE cases are rare, there are few reports with molecular confirmation of the causative species.

A study reports mitochondrial gene analysis from 4 Mongolian pediatric cerebral CE cases. Molecular confirmation was obtained for 3 of the 4 cases, with all 3 cases determined to be due to Echinococcus canadensis (G6/G7) infection. None of the cases had other organ involvement. This is only the third report on the molecular identification of the Echinococcus species responsible for cerebral CE, and only the second report of E. canadensis (G6/G7) being the causative agent of cerebral CE 1).

Case reports

2017

Surgical Planning for the Treatment of a Patient with Multiple, Secondary, Intracranial Echinococcal Cysts 2). Fatal Liver and Lung Alveolar Echinococcosis with Newly Developed Neurologic Symptoms due to the Brain Involvement 3).

2016

The fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis causes human alveolar echinococcosis, commonly affecting the liver. However, in ∼1% of cases, systematic spread of the disease involves the brain as well. A patient had a 6-year history of liver and lung alveolar echinococcosis that was considered not suitable for surgery, and treatment with albendazole was introduced. After the appearance of neurologic disturbances, an intracranial mass lesion was demonstrated by radiologic imaging. The lesion was surgically removed, and histologic analysis revealed metacestode tissue of E. multilocularis . Despite the surgical resection of the lesion, the patient died of progression of systemic alveolar echinococcosis. The authors highly recommend implementing neurologic monitoring to the follow-up algorithm for patients with systemically disseminated alveolar echinococcosis. When neurologic symptoms occur, radiologic imaging of the brain should be obtained immediately. Surgery should be considered for all intracranial echinococcal lesions, unless the lesion is located in the eloquent brain area 4).

2014

A 16-year-old boy referred to a tertiary center with intractable epilepsy for the previous three years despite receiving full doses of three antiepileptic drugs. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a left frontal calcified mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a well-defined spherical mass in the left frontal lobe, slightly hypointense on T1-weighted and heterogeneous hyperintense on T2-weighted images with no contrast enhancement. With a broad differential list in mind, a surgical intervention was planned. During surgery, a primary calcified cerebral echinococcal cyst with severe adhesion to the adjacent dura of the frontal region was discovered and removed intact. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis. Only phenobarbital was continued and no medical therapy for CE was administered. Two years after surgery, the patient remained free of seizures. In areas endemic for CE, cerebral echinococcal cyst should be included in the differential list of patients with intractable seizures. Though rare, this entity can present itself as a calcified mass on neuroimaging. Surgical removal of the calcified cyst is necessary for control and treatment of the epilepsy 5).

1)
Shirmen O, Batchuluun B, Lkhamjav A, Tseveen T, Munkhjargal T, Sandag T, Lkhagvasuren E, Yanagida T, Nishikawa Y, Ito A. Cerebral cystic echinococcosis in Mongolian children caused by Echinococcus canadensis. Parasitol Int. 2018 May 9. pii: S1383-5769(18)30120-X. doi: 10.1016/j.parint.2018.05.006. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29753095.
2)
Turgut AT, Turgut M. Surgical Planning for the Treatment of a Patient with Multiple, Secondary, Intracranial Echinococcal Cysts. Surg J (N Y). 2017 May 22;3(2):e88-e89. doi: 10.1055/s-0037-1603321. eCollection 2017 Apr. PubMed PMID: 28825027; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5553516.
3)
Turgut AT, Turgut M. Fatal Liver and Lung Alveolar Echinococcosis with Newly Developed Neurologic Symptoms due to the Brain Involvement. Surg J (N Y). 2017 May 25;3(2):e90. doi: 10.1055/s-0037-1603502. eCollection 2017 Apr. PubMed PMID: 28825028; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5553502.
4)
Kvascevicius R, Lapteva O, Awar OA, Audronyte E, Neverauskiene L, Kvasceviciene E, Sokolovas V, Strupas K, Marcinkute A, Deplazes P, Müllhaupt B. Fatal Liver and Lung Alveolar Echinococcosis with Newly Developed Neurologic Symptoms due to the Brain Involvement. Surg J (N Y). 2016 Sep 4;2(3):e83-e88. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1592122. eCollection 2016 Jul. PubMed PMID: 28824996; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5553476.
5)
Khalatbari MR, Brunetti E, Shobeiri E, Moharamzad Y. Calcified Mass on Brain CT in a Teenager with Refractory Seizures. Neuroradiol J. 2014 Dec 12;27(6):691-696. doi: 10.15274/NRJ-2014-10101. Epub 2014 Dec 1. PubMed PMID: 25489892.
cerebral_echinococcosis.txt · Last modified: 2018/05/13 11:51 by administrador