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clipping

Clipping

Microsurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms requires meticulous technique and is usually performed through open approaches. Endoscopic endonasal clipping of intracranial aneurysms may use the same techniques through an alternative corridor.

To enhance visual confirmation of regional anatomy, endoscopy was introduced.

see Endoscopic endonasal approach for intracranial aneurysm

see Surgical clipping versus endovascular coiling for intracranial aneurysm

Clipping is an important technique for intracranial aneurysm surgery. Although clip mechanisms and features have been refined, little attention has been paid to clip appliers. Clip closure is traditionally achieved by opening the grip of the clip applier. Sato et al.. reconsidered this motion and identified an important drawback, namely that the standard applier holding power decreased at the moment of clip release, which could lead to unstable clip application develop a forceps to address this clip applier design flaw.The new clip applier has a non–cross-type fulcrum that is closed at the time of clip release, with an action similar to that of a bipolar forceps or scissors. Thus, a surgeon can steadily apply the clip from various angles. They successfully used the clip applier to treat 103 aneurysms. Although training was required to ensure smooth applier use, no difficulties associated with applier use were noted. This clip applier can improve clipping surgery safety because it offers additional stability during clip release. 1).

Complications

Clipping is an independent risk factor for the development of early cerebral infarcts, whereas delayed cerebral infarcts are associated with angiographic vasospasm. Early cerebral infarcts are stronger predictors of worse outcome than delayed infarction 2).

Postclipping evaluation

A challenge is to ensure noninclusion of normal vessel/perforators within the clip and perform complete aneurysmal isolation. This is done with either intraoperative microvascular Doppler sonography (IMD) or Indocyanine green videoangiography (ICG-VA) as they are simple and safe. Anesthesiologists administer ICG and also help perform IMD. ICG-VA appropriately assessed vessel patency and aneurysm obliteration in 93.5% of 109 aneurysms clipped 3) However, ICG can cause transient oxygen desaturation 4). IMD use confirms aneurysm isolation and patency of parent vessel and branching arteries. Hui et al. observed that clip repositioning was required based on IMD findings in 24% of aneurysms clipped in 91 patients and concluded that IMD could reduce the rate of residual aneurysm and unanticipated vessel stenosis 5).

The complete clipping of a cerebral aneurysm usually warrants its sustained occlusion, while clip remnants may have far-reaching consequences. The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors for clip remnants requiring retreatment and/or exhibiting growth. METHODS All consecutive patients with primary aneurysm clipping performed at University Hospital of Essen between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, were eligible for this study. Aneurysm occlusion was judged on obligatory postoperative digital subtraction angiography and the need for repeated vascular control. The identified clip remnants were correlated with various demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, aneurysm features, and surgery-related aspects. RESULTS Of 616 primarily clipped aneurysms, postoperative angiography revealed 112 aneurysms (18%) with clip remnants requiring further control (n = 91) or direct retreatment (n = 21). Seven remnants exhibited growth during follow-up, whereas 2 cases were associated with aneurysmal bleeding. Therefore, a total of 28 aneurysms (4.5%) were retreated as clip remnants (range 1 day to 67 months after clipping). In the multivariate analysis, the need for retreatment of clip remnant was correlated with the aneurysm's initial size (> 12 mm; OR 3.22; p = 0.035) and location (anterior cerebral artery > internal carotid artery > posterior circulation > middle cerebral artery; OR 1.85; p = 0.003). Younger age with a cutoff at 45 years (OR 33.31; p = 0.004) was the only independent predictor for remnant growth. CONCLUSIONS The size and location of the aneurysm are the main risk factors for clip remnants requiring retreatment. Because of the risk for growth, younger individuals (< 45 years old) with clip remnants require a long-term (> 5 years) vascular follow-up. Clinical trial registration no: DRKS00008749 (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien) 6).

Costs

Total index hospitalization costs for clipping are lower than for coiling. Costs of clipping and coiling are driven by different clinical variables. The cost of coils and devices is the predominant contributor to the higher total costs of coiling 7).

The mechanisms underlying neurocognitive changes after surgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are poorly understood.

Minimal structural damage visualized on T2-weighted images at 6 months as a result of factors such as pial/microvascular injury and excessive retraction during surgical manipulation could cause subtle but significant negative effects on postoperative neurocognitive function after surgical clipping of a UIA. However, this detrimental effect was small, and based on the group-rate analysis

Successful and meticulous surgical clipping of a UIA does not adversely affect postoperative cognitive function 8).

Results of treatment after clipping and coiling do not differ in total for all patients, but differ depending on the presence of bleeding. Patients with bleeding aneurysms achieve better outcomes after coiling, and patients with non-bleeding aneurysms achieve better outcomes after clipping 9).

Awake clipping

Risk of ischemia during intracranial aneurysm surgery is significantly related to temporary clipping time and final clipping that might incorporate a perforator.

Abdulrauf et al. attempted to assess the potential added benefit to patient outcomes of “awake” neurological testing when compared with standard neurophysiological testing performed under general anesthesia. The procedure is performed after the induction of conscious sedation, and for the neurological testing, the patient is fully awake.

They conducted an institutional review board-approved prospective study of clipping unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in 30 consecutive adult patients who underwent awake clipping. The end points were the incidence of stroke/cerebrovascular accident (CVA), death, discharge to a long-term facility, length of stay, and 30-day modified Rankin Scale score. All clinical and neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring data were recorded.

The median patient age was 52 years (range 27-63 years); 19 (63%) female and 11 (37%) male patients were included. Twenty-seven (90%) aneurysms were anterior, and 3 (10%) were posterior circulation aneurysms. Five (17%) had been coiled previously, 3 (10%) had been clipped previously, 2 (7%) were partially calcified, and 2 (7%) were fusiform aneurysms. Three patients developed synchronous clinical neurological and neurophysiological changes during temporary clipping with consequent removal of the temporary clip and reversal of those clinical and neurophysiological changes. Three patients developed asynchronous clinical neurological and neurophysiological changes. These 3 patients developed hemiparesis without changes in neurophysiological monitoring results. One patient developed linked clinical neurological and neurophysiological changes during final clipping that were not reversed by reapplication of the clip, and the patient had a CVA. Four patients with internal carotid artery ophthalmic segment aneurysms underwent visual testing with final clipping, and 1 of these patients required repositioning of the clip. Three patients who required permanent occlusion of a vessel as part of their aneurysm treatment underwent a 10-minute intraoperative clinical respective-vessel test occlusion. The median length of stay was 3 days (range 1-5 days). The median modified Rankin Scale score was 1 (range 0-3). All of the patients were discharged to home from the hospital except for 1 who developed a CVA and was discharged to a rehabilitation facility. There were no deaths in this series.

The 3 patients who developed neurological deterioration without a concomitant neurophysiological finding during temporary clipping revealed a potential advantage of awake aneurysm surgery (i.e., in decreasing the risk of ischemic injury) 10).

Virtual reality simulator for aneurysmal clipping surgery

1)
Sato A, Koyama JI, Hanaoka Y, Hongo K. A Reverse-Action Clip Applier for Aneurysm Surgery. Neurosurgery. 2015 Mar 12. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25774701.
2)
Ayling OG, Ibrahim GM, Alotaibi NM, Gooderham PA, Macdonald RL. Dissociation of Early and Delayed Cerebral Infarction After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Stroke. 2016 Nov 8. pii: STROKEAHA.116.014794. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27827324.
3)
Özgiray E, Aktüre E, Patel N, Baggott C, Bozkurt M, Niemann D, et al. How reliable and accurate is indocyanine green video angiography in the evaluation of aneurysm obliteration? Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2013;115:870–8.
4)
Sriganesh K, Vinay B, Bhadrinarayan V. Indocyanine green dye administration can cause oxygen desaturation. J Clin Monit Comput. 2013;27:371.
5)
Hui PJ, Yan YH, Zhang SM, Wang Z, Yu ZQ, Zhou YX, et al. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler monitoring in intracranial aneurysm surgery. Chin Med J (Engl) 2013;126:2424–9.
6)
Jabbarli R, Pierscianek D, Wrede K, Dammann P, Schlamann M, Forsting M, Müller O, Sure U. Aneurysm remnant after clipping: the risks and consequences. J Neurosurg. 2016 Feb 12:1-7. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26871206.
7)
Duan Y, Blackham K, Nelson J, Selman W, Bambakidis N. Analysis of short-term total hospital costs and current primary cost drivers of coiling versus clipping for unruptured intracranial aneurysms. J Neurointerv Surg. 2014 Jun 2. pii: neurintsurg-2014-011249. doi: 10.1136/neurintsurg-2014-011249. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24891453.
8)
Inoue T, Ohwaki K, Tamura A, Tsutsumi K, Saito I, Saito N. Subtle structural change demonstrated on T2-weighted images after clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysm: negative effects on cognitive performance. J Neurosurg. 2014 Jan 31. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24484231.
9)
Birski M, Wałęsa C, Gaca W, Paczkowski D, Birska J, Harat A. Clipping versus coiling for intracranial aneurysms. Neurol Neurochir Pol. 2014 Mar-Apr;48(2):122-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pjnns.2014.03.002. Epub 2014 Mar 31. PubMed PMID: 24821638.
10)
Abdulrauf SI, Vuong P, Patel R, Sampath R, Ashour AM, Germany LM, Lebovitz J, Brunson C, Nijjar Y, Kyle Dryden J, Khan MQ, Stefan MG, Wiley E, Cleary RT, Reis C, Walsh J, Buchanan P. “Awake” clipping of cerebral aneurysms: report of initial series. J Neurosurg. 2016 Oct 21:1-8. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27767401.
clipping.txt · Last modified: 2017/10/04 13:33 by administrador