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epidermal_growth_factor_receptor

Epidermal growth factor receptor

The epidermal growth factor receptor is a member of the ErbB family of receptors, a subfamily of four closely related receptor tyrosine kinases: EGFR (ErbB-1), HER2/c-neu (ErbB-2), Her 3 (ErbB-3) and Her 4 (ErbB-4). Mutations affecting EGFR expression or activity could result in cancer.

Epidermal growth factor and its receptor was discovered by Stanley Cohen of Vanderbilt University. Cohen shared the 1986 Nobel Prize in Medicine with Rita Levi-Montalcini for their discovery of growth factors.


The receptor for epidermal growth factor (EGFR) is a prime target for cancer therapy across a broad variety of tumor types. As it is a tyrosine kinase, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting signal transduction, as well as monoclonal antibody against the EGFR, have been investigated as anti-tumor agents. However, despite the long-known enigmatic EGFR gene amplification and protein overexpression in glioblastoma, the most aggressive intrinsic human brain tumor, the potential of EGFR as a target for this tumor type has been unfulfilled 1).

This is in sharp contrast with the observations in EGFR-mutant lung cancer.


The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; ErbB-1; HER1 in humans) is the cell-surface receptor for members of the epidermal growth factor family (EGF-family) of extracellular protein ligands.

Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) secondary to EGFR gene amplification is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype and a worse clinical outcome.


Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), pMAPK, 4E-BP1, p4E-BP1, pS6, eIF4E, and peIF4E expression levels were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were semiquantitatively evaluated using a histoscore. Immunohistochemistry and PCR were used for IDH1 mutations. Statistical analysis was based on the following tests: chi-square, Student's t, Pearson correlation, Spearman's rho, and Mann-Whitney; ROC and Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed. A significant increase was observed between grades for expression of total and phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and for eIF4E, Ki67, EGFR, and cyclin D1. Although expression of EGFR, eIF4E, and Ki67 correlated with survival, only peIF4E was an independent predictor of survival in the multivariate analysis. Combining the evaluation of different proteins enables us to generate helpful diagnostic nomograms. In conclusion, cell signaling pathways are activated in DIAs; peIF4E is an independent prognostic factor and a promising therapeutic target. Joint analysis of the expression of 4E-BP1 and peIF4E could be helpful in the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme in small biopsy samples 2).


Ren et al., analyzed the microarray and proteomics profiles of tumor tissues from glioblastoma patients (N = 180), and identified potential RNA regulators of the Kininogen 1 (KNG1). Validation experiments in U87 glioblastoma cells showed that the regulation of KNG1 by CTU1, KIAA1274, and RAX was mediated by miR 138. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CTU1, KIAA1274, or RAX in U87 cells and immortalized human endothelial cells (iHECs) significantly reduced KNG1 expression (P < 0.05 for all), which resulted in the upregulation of oncogenic EGFR signaling in both cell lines, and stimulated angiogenic processes in cultured iHECs and zebrafish and mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma-induced angiogenesis. Angiogenic transduction of iHECs occurred via the uptake of U87-derived exosomes enriched in miR-138, with the siRNA-mediated knockdown of KNG1, CTU1, KIAA1274, or RAX increasing the level of miR-138 enrichment to varying extents and enhancing the angiogenic effects of the U87-derived exosomes on iHECs. The competing endogenous RNA network of KNG1 represents potential targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma 3).

EGFRvIII

Fluorophore/nanoparticle labeled with anti-EGFR antibodies

Senders et al., systematically review all clinically tested fluorescent agents for application in fluorescence guided surgery (FGS) for glioma and all preclinically tested agents with the potential for FGS for glioma.

They searched the PubMed and Embase databases for all potentially relevant studies through March 2016.

They assessed fluorescent agents by the following outcomes: rate of gross total resection (GTR), overall and progression free survival, sensitivity and specificity in discriminating tumor and healthy brain tissue, tumor-to-normal ratio of fluorescent signal, and incidence of adverse events.

The search strategy resulted in 2155 articles that were screened by titles and abstracts. After full-text screening, 105 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria evaluating the following fluorescent agents: 5 aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) (44 studies, including three randomized control trials), fluorescein (11), indocyanine green (five), hypericin (two), 5-aminofluorescein-human serum albumin (one), endogenous fluorophores (nine) and fluorescent agents in a pre-clinical testing phase (30). Three meta-analyses were also identified.

5-ALA is the only fluorescent agent that has been tested in a randomized controlled trial and results in an improvement of GTR and progression-free survival in high-grade gliomas. Observational cohort studies and case series suggest similar outcomes for FGS using fluorescein. Molecular targeting agents (e.g., fluorophore/nanoparticle labeled with anti-EGFR antibodies) are still in the pre-clinical phase, but offer promising results and may be valuable future alternatives. 4).

References

1)
Westphal M, Maire CL, Lamszus K. EGFR as a Target for Glioblastoma Treatment: An Unfulfilled Promise. CNS Drugs. 2017 Aug 8. doi: 10.1007/s40263-017-0456-6. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28791656.
2)
Martínez-Sáez E, Peg V, Ortega-Aznar A, Martínez-Ricarte F, Camacho J, Hernández-Losa J, Ferreres Piñas JC, Ramón Y Cajal S. peIF4E as an independent prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in diffuse infiltrating astrocytomas. Cancer Med. 2016 Jul 20. doi: 10.1002/cam4.817. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27440383.
3)
Ren Y, Ji N, Kang X, Wang R, Ma W, Hu Z, Liu X, Wang Y. Aberrant ceRNA-mediated regulation of KNG1 contributes to glioblastoma-induced angiogenesis. Oncotarget. 2016 Oct 14. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.12659. PubMed PMID: 27764797.
4)
Senders JT, Muskens IS, Schnoor R, Karhade AV, Cote DJ, Smith TR, Broekman ML. Agents for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery: a systematic review of preclinical and clinical results. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2017 Jan;159(1):151-167. doi: 10.1007/s00701-016-3028-5. Review. PubMed PMID: 27878374; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5177668.
epidermal_growth_factor_receptor.txt · Last modified: 2017/08/10 12:57 by administrador