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traumatic_brain_injury_epidemiology

Traumatic brain injury epidemiology

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a critical public health and socio-economic problem throughout the world, making epidemiological monitoring of incidence, prevalence and outcome necessary.

It is one of leading causes of mortality and disability worldwide and is estimated to surpass many diseases by 2020 1) 2).

It is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children 3).

Nonaccidental head injury, as seen in domestic child abuse cases, is often associated with spine injury, and spinal subdural hematoma is the most frequent diagnosis. While spinal epidural hematomas are a rare occurrence, the incidence of spontaneous epidural hematomas occurring in nonaccidental head injury patients is even lower 4).

Epidemiology in the United States

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that more than 1.7 million each year in USA sustain TBI. Of these, approximately 1.4 million are treated and released from emergency centers, 275,000 are hospitalized, 80,000 suffer long-term disability and 52,000 die 5) ,and another 235,000 are hospitalized for non-fatal TBI 6).

Incidence of TBI in all industrialized countries is comparable to the U.S., with estimates ranging from 150 to more than 300 per 100,000

Annual incidence of approximately 250-600 patients per 100,000, and mortality of 17 cases per 100,000.

It is one of the most common causes of death in ordinary accidents, natural disasters, or warfare.

These injuries frequently occur outside, leaving injured individuals exposed to environmental temperature extremes before they are transported to a hospital.

Each year, approximately 100,000 patients require neurosurgical evacuation of an intracranial hematoma in the United States 7).

There are strong and demographically stable associations between TBI and substance use. These associations may not only increase the odds of injury but impair the quality of post injury recovery 8).

Epidemiology in India

The exact incidence is unavailable in India.

From August 2012 to May 2013 at Department of Neurosurgery, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India. All the pertinent details from case records of hundred and forty-seven children <15 years with TBI were analyzed. Follow-up was done for 6 months at outpatients department.

Age wise, incidence and severity of TBI is more common in 10-15 years. Males outnumber females with a male: female ratio 2.19:1. Overall, road traffic accident (RTA) is the commonest mode of injury. Assault is not uncommon (7.48% cases). Falls is common in <5 years while RTA is common in 5-15 years. The extradural hematoma was the most common injury pattern; however, surgical consideration was maximal for fracture skull. Overall mortality was 7.48%. Diffuse axonal injury has the maximum individual potential for mortality. We noticed excellent recovery in 68.7%, disabilities in 17.68%, and persistent vegetative state in 5.45% cases.

TBI in children carries good outcome, if resuscitated and referred early to a neurotrauma center, and managed subsequently on an individualized basis with a well-organized team approach. Severe TBI in children has a poor outcome 9).

Epidemiology in Europe

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department (ED) and hospital admission in Europe.

In total, 28 epidemiological studies on TBI from 16 European countries were identified in the literature. A great variation was found in case definitions and case ascertainment between studies. Falls and road traffic accidents (RTA) were the two most frequent causes of TBI, with falls being reported more frequently than RTA 10).

In 2006 it was difficult to reach a consensus on all epidemiological findings across the 23 published European studies because of critical differences in methods employed across the reports 11).

2015

A search was conducted in the PubMed electronic database using the terms: epidemiology, incidence, brain injur*, head injur* and Europe. Only articles published in English and reporting on data collected in Europe between 1990 and 2014 were included. In total, 28 epidemiological studies on TBI from 16 European countries were identified in the literature. A great variation was found in case definitions and case ascertainment between studies. Falls and road traffic accidents (RTA) were the two most frequent causes of TBI, with falls being reported more frequently than RTA. In most of the studies a peak TBI incidence was seen in the oldest age groups. In the meta-analysis, an overall incidence rate of 262 per 100,000 for admitted TBI was derived.

Interpretation of published epidemiologic studies is confounded by differences in inclusion criteria and case ascertainment. Nevertheless, changes in epidemiological patterns are found: falls are now the most common cause of TBI, most notably in elderly patients. Improvement of the quality of standardised data collection for TBI is mandatory for reliable monitoring of epidemiological trends and to inform appropriate targeting of prevention campaigns 12).

Romania

A coordinated strategy to evaluate this public health problem in Romania would first of all rely on a related advanced monitoring system, to provide precise information about the epidemiology, clinical and paraclinical data, but concerning the social and economic connected consequences, too 13).

1)
Hyder AA, Wunderlich CA, Puvanachandra P, Gururaj G, Kobusingye OC. The impact of traumatic brain injuries: A global perspective. NeuroRehabilitation 2007;22:341-53. Back to cited text no. 1
2)
Lopez AD, Murray CC. The global burden of disease, 1990-2020. Nat Med 1998;4:1241-3.
3)
K. S. Quayle, D. M. Jaffe, N. Kuppermann et al., “Diagnostic testing for acute head injury in children: when are head computed tomography and skull radiographs indicated?” Pediatrics, vol. 99, no. 5, article e11, 1997.
4)
Rangwala SD, Birk DM, Tobin MK, Hahn YS, Nikas DC. Spontaneous Resolution of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Resulting from Domestic Child Abuse: Case Report. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2016 Sep 20. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27644085.
5)
Faul M, Xu L, Wald MM & Coronado VG. (2010). Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations and Deaths 2002–2006. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
6)
Corrigan JD, Selassie AW, Orman JA. The epidemiology of traumatic brain injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil 2010; 25: 72–80.
7)
Feinberg M, Mai JC, Ecklund J. Neurosurgical Management in Traumatic Brain Injury. Semin Neurol. 2015 Feb;35(1):50-56. Epub 2015 Feb 25. PubMed PMID: 25714867.
8)
Ilie G, Mann RE, Hamilton H, Adlaf EM, Boak A, Asbridge M, Rehm J, Cusimano MD. Substance Use and Related Harms Among Adolescents With and Without Traumatic Brain Injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2014 Nov 25. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25427256.
9)
Satapathy MC, Dash D, Mishra SS, Tripathy SR, Nath PC, Jena SP. Spectrum and outcome of traumatic brain injury in children <15 years: A tertiary level experience in India. Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci. 2016 Jan-Mar;6(1):16-20. PubMed PMID: 27051617.
10) , 12)
Peeters W, van den Brande R, Polinder S, Brazinova A, Steyerberg EW, Lingsma HF, Maas AI. Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury in Europe. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2015 Oct;157(10):1683-96. doi: 10.1007/s00701-015-2512-7. Epub 2015 Aug 14. PubMed PMID: 26269030.
11)
Tagliaferri F, Compagnone C, Korsic M, Servadei F, Kraus J. A systematic review of brain injury epidemiology in Europe. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2006 Mar;148(3):255-68; discussion 268. Review. PubMed PMID: 16311842.
13)
Popescu C, Anghelescu A, Daia C, Onose G. Actual data on epidemiological evolution and prevention endeavours regarding traumatic brain injury. J Med Life. 2015 Jul-Sep;8(3):272-7. Review. PubMed PMID: 26351526; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4556905.
traumatic_brain_injury_epidemiology.txt · Last modified: 2017/12/05 12:22 by administrador