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anterior_cervical_approach_complications

Anterior cervical approach complications

Without special modifications, a routine anterior cervical approach is usually able to access levels C3–7. In patients with short thick necks, access may be even more limited. In some cases, with long thin necks, up to C2–3 or as low as C7-T1 can be approached anteriorly.

Approach to the anterior subaxial cervical spine or the high thoracic spine is more challenging and harbors approach-related complication. Pre-operative evaluation of patients imaging allows harnessing the standard approach for treatment of extreme levels with relative safety and efficiency. Spine surgeons' awareness to this technique may increase surgical efficacy while reducing the complication rates 1).


While performing the anterior cervical approach, injury to important anatomic structures in the vicinity of the dissection represents a serious risk. The midportion of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve are encountered in the anterior approach to the lower cervical spine. The recurrent laryngeal nerve is vulnerable to injury on the right side, especially if ligation of inferior thyroid vessels is performed without paying sufficient attention to the course and position of the nerve, and the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve is vulnerable to injury during ligature and division of the superior thyroid artery. Avoiding injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (especially on the right side) and superior laryngeal nerve is a major consideration in the anterior approach to the lower cervical spine. The sympathetic trunk is situated in close proximity to the medial border of the longus colli at the C6 level (the longus colli diverge laterally, whereas the sympathetic trunk converges medially). The damage leads to the development of Horner's syndrome with its associated ptosis, meiosis, and anhydrosis. Awareness of the regional anatomy of the sympathetic trunk may help in identifying and preserving this important structure while performing anterior cervical surgery or during exposure of the transverse foramen or uncovertebral joint at the lower cervical levels. Finally, the spinal accessory nerve (embedded in fibroadipose tissue in the posterior triangle of the neck) is prone to injury. Its damage will result in an obvious shoulder droop, loss of shoulder elevation, and pain. Prevention of inadvertant injury to the accessory nerve is critical in the neck dissection 2).

Case series

A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in a retrospective, case-control study. The diagnosis was cervical radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy due to degenerative disc disease, cervical spondylosis, or traumatic cervical spine injury. All our participants underwent surgical treatment, and complications were recorded. The most commonly performed procedure (79%) was anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Fourteen patients (12.3%) underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and interbody fusion, seven (6.1%) ACDF with plating, two (1.7%) odontoid screw fixation, and one anterior removal of osteophytes for severe Forestier's disease. Mean follow-up time was 42.5 months (range, 6-78 months). The overall complication rate was 13.2%. Specifically, we encountered adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration in 2.7% of our cases, dysphagia in 1.7%, postoperative soft tissue swelling and hematoma in 1.7%, and dural penetration in 1.7%. Additionally, esophageal perforation was observed in 0.9%, aggravation of preexisting myelopathy in 0.9%, symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 0.9%, mechanical failure in 0.9%, and superficial wound infection in 0.9%. In the vast majority anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications are minor, requiring no further intervention. Awareness, early recognition, and appropriate management, are of paramount importance for improving the patients' overall functional outcome 3).

1)
Harel R, Nulman M, Cohen ZR, Knoller N. Anterior cervical approach for the treatment of axial or high thoracic levels. Br J Neurosurg. 2018 May 10:1-5. doi: 10.1080/02688697.2018.1471123. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29745733.
2)
Lu J, Ebraheim NA, Nadim Y, Huntoon M. Anterior approach to the cervical spine: surgical anatomy. Orthopedics. 2000 Aug;23(8):841-5. Review. PubMed PMID: 10952048.
3)
Tasiou A, Giannis T, Brotis AG, Siasios I, Georgiadis I, Gatos H, Tsianaka E, Vagkopoulos K, Paterakis K, Fountas KN. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study. J Spine Surg. 2017 Sep;3(3):444-459. doi: 10.21037/jss.2017.08.03. Review. PubMed PMID: 29057356; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5637201.
anterior_cervical_approach_complications.txt · Last modified: 2019/09/06 13:59 by administrador