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brown_sequard_syndrome

Brown-Séquard syndrome

Brown Séquard syndrome, also known as Brown-Séquard's hemiplegia and Brown-Séquard's paralysis, is a loss of sensation and motor function (paralysis and anesthesia) that is caused by the lateral hemisection (cutting) of the spinal cord. Other synonyms are hemiparaplegic syndrome, hemiplegia et hemiparaplegia spinalis, and spinal hemiparaplegia. It is named after physiologist Charles-Édouard Brown-Séquard, who first described the condition in 1850.

see Brown Sequard plus syndrome.

Etiology

Brown-Sèquard syndrome is most commonly seen with spinal trauma and extramedullary spinal neoplasm.

A herniated cervical disc has rarely been considered to be a cause of Brown-Sèquard syndrome.

Kobayashi et al. reported reported in 2003 two cases of Brown-Sèquard syndrome produced by herniated cervical disc.

The first patient was a 64-year-old man who presented with right leg weakness and diminished sensation to pain and temperature in the left side below the T4 dermatome. The second patient was a 39-year-old man who presented with right-sided weakness and diminished sensation to pain and temperature in the left side below the T6 dermatome.

Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion was performed for these patients.

These cases revealed contralateral deficit in sensation of pain and temperature of more than a few levels below the cord compression, and showed paracentral protruded disc in magnetic resonance images and cervical spinal stenosis in cervical spine X-rays. Postoperatively, motor and sensory function of these patients returned to normal.

Characteristic finding in discogenic Brown-Sèquard syndrome are contralateral deficit in sensation of pain and temperature of more below than a few levels below the cord compression and paracentral protruded disc with cervical spinal stenosis. Outcomes are favorable in rapid diagnosis by magnetic resonance images and performance of anterior approach 1).


Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is a relatively rare and frequently misdiagnosed condition. It preferentially affects women and causes progressive thoracic myelopathy that presents as a Brown Séquard syndrome or as spastic paraparesis

1)
Kobayashi N, Asamoto S, Doi H, Sugiyama H. Brown-Sèquard syndrome produced by cervical disc herniation: report of two cases and review of the literature. Spine J. 2003 Nov-Dec;3(6):530-3. Review. PubMed PMID: 14609700.
brown_sequard_syndrome.txt · Last modified: 2019/08/13 15:34 by administrador