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degenerative_cervical_myelopathy

Degenerative cervical myelopathy

The assessment, diagnosis, operative and nonoperative management of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) have evolved rapidly over the last 20 years. A clearer understanding of the pathobiology of DCM has led to attempts to develop objective measurements of the severity of myelopathy, including technology such as multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, biomarkers, and ancillary clinical testing. New pharmacological treatments have the potential to alter the course of surgical outcomes, and greater innovation in surgical techniques have made surgery safer, more effective and less invasive. Future developments for the treatment of DCM will seek to improve the diagnostic accuracy of imaging, improve the objectivity of clinical assessment, and increase the use of surgical techniques to ensure the best outcome is achieved for each individual patient 1).

Goel was troubled by the fact that his several PubMed and MEDLINE indexed articles on the subject published in leading journals dedicated to the study of the spine have not found any place in the huge reference list of 137 articles 2)

Definition

Degenerative cervical myelopathy definition.

Epidemiology

Degenerative cervical myelopathy epidemiology.

Etiology

Degenerative cervical myelopathy etiology.

Pathophysiology

A review of Tetreault et al. summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies 3).

Clinical features

Patients may initially experience minimal symptoms 4) 5) but subsequently often develop pain, sensory deficits especially affecting their hands and feet, spasticity, imbalance, bladder symptoms, and experience frequent falls 6).

Diagnosing DCSM has traditionally relied on presence of clinical symptoms, including clumsy hands, paralysis of the lower extremities, gait disturbances, urinary/bowel incontinence and severe neurological dysfunction disturbances, urinary/bowel incontinence, and severe neurological dysfunction 7) 8).

Many people with cervical spondylosis or CSM are asymptomatic. However, patients with CSM are at higher risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) following minor injury.

Only a small percentage of people with spondylosis go on to develop symptoms consistent with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), which can cause significant and disabling neurological deficits, leading to loss of function, morbidity, and mortality.

In addition, diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequent comorbidity for people of this age and may impact the severity of CCM.

Scales

European myelopathy score.

As a widespread used scale, the Modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale (mJOA) should be translated and culturally adapted 9).

see Cervical spine stenosis scales

Diagnosis

Degenerative cervical myelopathy diagnosis.

Treatment

Cervical spondylotic myelopathy treatment.

Outcome

see Degenerative cervical myelopathy outcome.

Randomized, controlled trials

A National Institutes of Health-funded (1R13AR065834-01) investigator meeting was held before the initiation of the trial to bring multiple stakeholders together to finalize the study protocol. Study investigators, coordinators, and major stakeholders were able to attend and discuss strengths of, limitations of, and concerns about the study. The final protocol was approved for funding by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (CE-1304-6173). The trial began enrollment on April 1, 2014 10).

Case series

see Degenerative cervical myelopathy case series.

References

1)
Wilson JRF, Badhiwala JH, Moghaddamjou A, Martin AR, Fehlings MG. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy; A Review of the Latest Advances and Future Directions in Management. Neurospine. 2019 Sep;16(3):494-505. doi: 10.14245/ns.1938314.157. Epub 2019 Aug 26. PubMed PMID: 31476852; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6790745.
2)
Goel A. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy. Neurospine. 2019 Dec;16(4):793-795. doi: 10.14245/ns.1938384.192. Epub 2019 Dec 31. PubMed PMID: 31905465.
3)
Tetreault L, Goldstein CL, Arnold P, Harrop J, Hilibrand A, Nouri A, Fehlings MG. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine. Neurosurgery. 2015 Oct;77 Suppl 4:S51-67. doi: 10.1227/NEU.0000000000000951. PubMed PMID: 26378358.
4)
Kovalova I, Kerkovsky M, Kadanka Z, Kadanka Z Jr, Nemec M, Jurova B, Dusek L, Jarkovsky J, Bednarik J. Prevalence and Imaging Characteristics of Nonmyelopathic and Myelopathic Spondylotic Cervical Cord Compression. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2016 Dec 15;41(24):1908-1916. PubMed PMID: 27509189.
5)
Martin AR, De Leener B, Cohen-Adad J, Cadotte DW, Nouri A, Wilson JR, Tetreault L, Crawley AP, Mikulis DJ, Ginsberg H, Fehlings MG. Can microstructural MRI detect subclinical tissue injury in subjects with asymptomatic cervical spinal cord compression? A prospective cohort study. BMJ Open. 2018 Apr 13;8(4):e019809. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019809. PubMed PMID: 29654015; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5905727.
6)
Davies BM, Mowforth OD, Smith EK, Kotter MR. Degenerative cervical myelopathy. BMJ. 2018 Feb 22;360:k186. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k186. Review. PubMed PMID: 29472200; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6074604.
7)
Guan L, Chen X, Hai Y, et al. High-resolution diffusion tensor imaging in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: A preliminary follow-up study. NMR Biomed. 2017
8)
Sampath P, Bendebba M, Davis JD, et al. Outcome of patients treated for cervical myelopathy. A prospective, multicenter study with independent clinical review. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2000;25(6):670–76.
9)
Augusto MT, Diniz JM, Rolemberg Dantas FL, Fernandes de Oliveira M, Rotta JM, Botelho RV. Development of the Portuguese version of the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score: cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, validity and responsiveness. World Neurosurg. 2018 Jun 1. pii: S1878-8750(18)31127-6. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.05.173. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29864576.
10)
Ghogawala Z, Benzel EC, Heary RF, Riew KD, Albert TJ, Butler WE, Barker FG 2nd, Heller JG, McCormick PC, Whitmore RG, Freund KM, Schwartz JS. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Surgical Trial: Randomized, Controlled Trial Design and Rationale. Neurosurgery. 2014 Oct;75(4):334-346. PubMed PMID: 24991714.
degenerative_cervical_myelopathy.txt · Last modified: 2020/01/07 19:38 by administrador