national_cancer_database

National Cancer Database

The nationally recognized National Cancer Database (NCDB)—jointly sponsored by the American College of Surgeons and the American Cancer Society—is a clinical oncology database sourced from hospital registry data that are collected in more than 1,500 Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited facilities. NCDB data are used to analyze and track patients with malignant neoplastic diseases, their treatments, and outcomes. Data represent more than 70 percent of newly diagnosed cancer cases nationwide and more than 34 million historical records.

Online reporting tools are available to provide your program with comparative benchmarks for similar programs aggregated throughout your state, region, and across CoC-accredited programs as a whole. Additional reporting tools provide quality related performance measures in comparison to aggregated CoC-accredited programs, including quality improvement, quality assurance, and surveillance measures. Through comparison and evaluation, you can proactively improve delivery and quality of care for cancer patients in your cancer program.


Kann et al. sought to evaluate national practice patterns for patients with metastatic disease receiving brain RT. They queried the National Cancer Database (NCDB) for patients diagnosed with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or melanoma from 2004 to 2014 who received upfront brain RT. Patients were divided into SRS and non-SRS cohorts. Patient and facility-level SRS predictors were analyzed with chi-square tests and logistic regression, and uptake trends were approximated with linear regression. Survival by diagnosis year was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of 75,953 patients, 12,250 (16.1%) received SRS and 63,703 (83.9%) received non-SRS. From 2004 to 2014, the proportion of patients receiving SRS annually increased (from 9.8% to 25.6%; P<.001), and the proportion of facilities using SRS annually increased (from 31.2% to 50.4%; P<.001). On multivariable analysis, nonwhite race, nonprivate insurance, and residence in lower-income or less-educated regions predicted lower SRS use (P<.05 for each). During the study period, SRS use increased disproportionally among patients with private insurance or who resided in higher-income or higher-educated regions. From 2004 to 2013, 1-year actuarial survival improved from 24.1% to 49.6% for patients selected for SRS and from 21.0% to 26.3% for non-SRS patients (P<.001). Conclusions: This NCDB analysis demonstrates steadily increasing-although modest overall-brain SRS use for patients with metastatic disease in the United States and identifies several progressively widening sociodemographic disparities in the adoption of SRS. Further research is needed to determine the reasons for these worsening disparities and their clinical implications on intracranial control, neurocognitive toxicities, quality of life, and survival for patients with brain metastases 1).


1)
Kann BH, Park HS, Johnson SB, Chiang VL, Yu JB. Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Changing Practice Patterns and Disparities in the United States. J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2017 Dec;15(12):1494-1502. doi: 10.6004/jnccn.2017.7003. PubMed PMID: 29223987.
  • national_cancer_database.txt
  • Last modified: 2020/10/15 09:03
  • by administrador