User Tools

Site Tools


oral_anticoagulant

Oral anticoagulant

Oral anticoagulation was first established in 1941 by Karl Paul Link, who discovered dicumarol 1).

Novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs) which directly inhibit thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban and apixaban) have recently been developed.

Novel oral anticoagulants

Novel oral anticoagulants.

Vitamin K oral anticoagulant

see Vitamin K oral anticoagulant.

Non vitamin K oral anticoagulant

see Non vitamin K oral anticoagulant.

Complications

Patients with minor and moderate associated bleeding can be treated with supportive care and general hemostatic measures. Nonspecific reversal agents (eg, prothrombin complex concentrate, activated prothrombin complex concentrate) are of unproven benefit, carry a risk of thrombosis, and should be reserved for severe bleeding. Specific reversal agents, such as idarucizumab (a monoclonal antibody fragment that binds dabigatran) and andexanet alfa (a recombinant factor Xa variant that binds factor Xa inhibitors but lacks coagulant activity), are in clinical development 2).

References

1)
Campbell HA, Roberts WL, Smith WK, Link KP. Studies of the hemorrhagic sweet clover disease. I. The preparation of hemorrhagic concentrates. J Biol Chem. 1940;136:47–55.
2)
Cuker A, Siegal D. Monitoring and reversal of direct oral anticoagulants. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2015 Dec 5;2015(1):117-24. doi: 10.1182/asheducation-2015.1.117. PubMed PMID: 26637710.
oral_anticoagulant.txt · Last modified: 2020/02/06 20:21 by administrador