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spontaneous_intracerebral_hemorrhage

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), is nontraumatic bleeding into the brain parenchyma.

Epidemiology

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a global public health issue and accounts for 10–15% of all stroke cases 1).

It is the second most common subtype of stroke, with 5.3 million cases and over 3 million deaths reported worldwide in 2010.

In 2001 the annual incidence of 20–30 per 1,000,000 people 2).

Etiology

Psychosocial, ethnic, and economic factors play a role in the prevalence of cerebral hemorrhage, with ICH being twice as common in low-income and middle-income countries compared with high-income countries. Other identified risk factors for ICH include age (i.e., each decade from 50 years of age is associated with a 2-fold increase in the incidence of ICH) and an elevated alcohol intake.

Etiologies of ICH to always consider include: intracranial aneurysms (typically presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage); arteriovenous malformations (ICH is the first presentation of AVMs in 60 % of cases); cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and venous infarction; brain tumors (<5 % of all ICH cases) including cerebral metastasis (e.g., lung cancer, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, and choriocarcinoma) and primary CNS tumors (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme and oligodendrogliomas); and drugs of abuse (e.g., cocaine, amphetamines). Because of the differing etiologies of ICH, a rapid and accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology of ICH is essential to direct appropriate management strategies.

The most important modifiable risk factor in spontaneous ICH is chronic arterial hypertension:

see Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

Besides hypertension, cerebrovascular amyloid deposition (i.e., cerebral amyloid angiopathy) is associated with ICH in older patients.

It is a common initial symptom of intracranial vascular malformations.

see Spontaneous intracranial hematoma caused by neoplasm


Coagulopathies (i.e., the use of antithrombotic or thrombolytic agents, congenital or acquired factor deficiencies) and systemic diseases, such as thrombocytopenia, are possible causes of ICH. The use of oral anticoagulants, especially vitamin K inhibitors (i.e., warfarin), has increased coagulopathy-associated ICH in recent years, accounting for more than 15 % of all cases

see Anticoagulant Related Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

see Aneurysmal intracerebral hemorrhage.

see Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and venous infarction.

Posterior fossa surgery

Remote supratentorial hematoma soon after posterior fossa surgery for the removal of a space-occupying lesion is a rare but dramatic and dreaded complication, carrying significant morbidity and mortality 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10).

Scales

see ICH Score.

Diagnosis

Treatment

Outcome

Complications

Hematoma expansion is an important determinant of outcome in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) due to small vessel disease (SVD).

Acute hydrocephalus

Case series

Case reports

References

1)
Qureshi AI, Mendelow AD, Hanley DF. Intracerebral haemorrhage. Lancet. 2009 May 9;373(9675):1632-44. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60371-8. Review. PubMed PMID: 19427958; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3138486.
2)
Qureshi AI, Tuhrim S, Broderick JP, Batjer HH, Hanley DF. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. N Engl J Med. 2001;14:1450–1460. doi: 10.1056/NEJM200105103441907.
3)
Bucciero A, Quaglietta P, Vizioli L. Supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery: Case report. J Neurosurg Sci. 1991;35:221–4.
4)
Haines SJ, Maroon JC, Jannetta PJ. Supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage following posterior fossa surgery. J Neurosurg. 1978;49:881–6.
5)
Harders A, Gilsbach J, Weigel K. Supratentorial space occupying lesions following infratentorial surgery early diagnosis and treatment. Acta Neurochir (Wien) 1985;74:57–60.
6)
Seiler RW, Zurbrugg HR. Supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage after posterior fossa operation. Neurosurgery. 1986;18:472–4.
7)
Tondon A, Mahapatra AK. Superatentorial intracerebral hemorrhage following infratentorial surgery. J Clin Neurosci. 2004;11:762–5.
8)
Vrettou CS, Stavrinou LC, Halikias S, Kyriakopoulou M, Kollias S, Stranjalis G, et al. Factor XIII deficiency as a potential cause of supratentorial haemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery. Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2010;152:529–32.
9)
Pandey P, Madhugiri VS, Sattur MG, Devi BI. Remote supratentorial extradural hematoma following posterior fossa surgery. Childs Nerv Syst. 2008;24:851–4.
10)
Wolfsberger S, Gruber A, Czech T. Multiple supratentorial epidural haematomas after posterior fossa surgery. Neurosurg Rev. 2004;27:128–32.
spontaneous_intracerebral_hemorrhage.txt · Last modified: 2019/09/18 08:28 by administrador